Alternative Histories of the English Language by Peter Trudgill, Richard J. Watts

By Peter Trudgill, Richard J. Watts

This groundbreaking assortment explores the ideals and ways to the heritage of English that don't make it into average textbooks.
Orthodox histories have provided a tunnel model of the historical past of the English language that is sociologically insufficient. during this publication quite a number major foreign students exhibit how this concentrate on commonplace English dialect is to the detriment of these that are non-standard or from different components of the area. Alternative Histories of English:
* finds the diversity of attainable 'narratives' approximately how diversified forms of 'Englishes' can have emerged
* locations emphasis on pragmatic, sociolinguistic and discourse-oriented points of English instead of the normal grammar, vocabulary and phonology
* considers varied themes together with South African English, Indian English, Southern Hemisphere Englishes, Early smooth English, women's writing, and politeness.
Presenting a fuller and richer photo of the complexity of the background of English, the members to Alternative Histories of English clarify why English is the various international language it's this present day.

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Alternative Histories of the English Language

This groundbreaking assortment explores the ideals and techniques to the heritage of English that don't make it into general textbooks. Orthodox histories have offered a tunnel model of the heritage of the English language that's sociologically insufficient. during this booklet more than a few top foreign students convey how this specialize in typical English dialect is to the detriment of these that are non-standard or from different parts of the area.

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Extra resources for Alternative Histories of the English Language

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Central America San Andrés and Providencia are Caribbean islands with a total land area of about 45 km2 and a population of about 35,000. They lie about 180 km off the coast of Nicaragua and about 700 km northwest of mainland Colombia. They nevertheless constitute part of Colombia: Colombia controlled what is now Panama until 1903, which helps to explain this geographical anomaly. The islands were settled in 1629 by English Puritans, and subsequently also by Jamaican planters and their Black slaves.

Jespersen (1962: 17–54), writing about Old English (the first edition of this book was published in 1938), repeatedly called the language and the people simply ‘English’, rather than ‘Anglo-Saxon’. Let us look, however, at a brief passage from King Alfred’s writings: Ælfred kyning hate∂ gretan Wærfær∂ biscep his wordum luflice and freondlice; ond ∂e cy∂an hate ∂æt me com swi∂e oft on gemynd, hwelce wiotan iu wæron geond Angelcynn … [King Alfred bids to greet his bishop Wærfærth in affectionate and friendly words; and (I) bid to inform you that it came very often into (my) mind, what learned men there used to be throughout the English people (or nation) …] If we did not know the provenance of this text and had no other Old English (OE) texts, we would be unlikely to classify it as ‘English’ or even relate it closely to Middle English.

Hans Frede Nielsen has reviewed much of this, and for the purpose of tracing ideological influences, certain main features stand out. First, it appears to have been Henry Sweet (an Englishman) who first postulated (1877: 562) the prior existence of a pre-English ‘Anglo-Frisian’ stage, and later H. M. Chadwick (also British) who commented (1907: 60) that there can be no doubt that Frisian is ‘by far the [language] most nearly related to English’. Nielsen’s conclusion (1981: 256–7) is that Old English is indeed most similar The legitimate language 19 to Old Frisian.

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